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Hotels of Guyana

A hotel in Guyana is an establishment that provides lodging paid on a short-term basis. Facilities provided may range from a basic bed and storage for clothing, to luxury features like en-suite bathrooms. Larger in Guyana hotels may provide additional guest facilities such as a swimming pool, business centre, childcare, conference facilities and social function services. Hotel rooms in Guyana are usually numbered (or named in some smaller hotels and B&Bs) to allow guests to identify their room. Some Guyana hotels offer meals as part of a room and board arrangement. Hotel operations vary in size, function, and cost. Most Guyana hotels and major hospitality companies that operate hotels in Guyana have set widely accepted industry standards to classify hotel types. General categories include the following:

Upscale luxury hotels in Guyana
An upscale full service hotel facility in Guyana that offers luxury amenities, full service accommodations, on-site full service restaurant(s), and the highest level of personalized and professional service. Luxury Guyana hotels are normally classified with at least a Four Diamond or Five Diamond status or a Four or Five Star rating depending on classification standards.

Full service hotels in Guyana
Full service Guyana hotels often contain upscale full-service facilities with a large volume of full service accommodations, on-site full service restaurant(s), and a variety of on-site amenities such as swimming pools, a health club, children's activities, ballrooms, on-site conference facilities, etc.

Historic inns and boutique hotels in Guyana
Boutique hotels of Guyana are smaller independent non-branded hotels that often contain upscale facilities of varying size in unique or intimate settings with full service accommodations. Guyana boutique hotels are generally 100 rooms or less. Some historic inns and boutique hotels in Guyana may be classified as luxury hotels.

Focused or select service hotels in Guyana
Small to medium-sized hotel establishments that offer a limited amount of on-site amenities that only cater and market to a specific demographic of Guyana travelers, such as the single business traveler. Most Guyana focused or select service hotels may still offer full service accommodations but may lack leisure amenities such as an on-site restaurant or a swimming pool.

Economy and limited service hotels in Guyana
Small to medium-sized Guyana hotel establishments that offer a very limited amount of on-site amenities and often only offer basic accommodations with little to no services, these facilities normally only cater and market to a specific demographic of travelers, such as the budget-minded Guyana traveler seeking a "no frills" accommodation. Limited service Guyana hotels often lack an on-site restaurant but in return may offer a limited complimentary food and beverage amenity such as on-site continental breakfast service.

Guest houses and B&Bs in Guyana
A bed and breakfast in Guyana is a small lodging establishment that offers overnight accommodation and inclusive breakfast. Usually, Guyana bed and breakfasts are private homes or family homes offering accommodations. The typical Guyana B&B has between 4 and 11 rooms, with 6 being the average. Generally, guests are accommodated in private bedrooms with private bathrooms, or in a suite of rooms including an en suite bathroom. Some homes have private bedrooms with a bathroom which is shared with other guests. Breakfast is served in the bedroom, a dining room, or the host's kitchen. Often the owners of guest house themselves prepare the breakfast and clean the rooms.

Hostels in Guyana
Guyana hostels provide budget-oriented, sociable accommodation where guests can rent a bed, usually a bunk bed, in a dormitory and share a bathroom, lounge, and sometimes a kitchen. Rooms can be mixed or single-sex, although private rooms may also be available. Hostels are often cheaper for both the operator and occupants; many Guyana hostels have long-term residents whom they employ as desk agents or housekeeping staff in exchange for experience or discounted accommodation.

Apartment hotels, extended stay hotels in Guyana
Extended stay hotels are small to medium-sized Guyana hotels that offer longer term full service accommodations compared to a traditional hotel. Extended stay hotels may offer non-traditional pricing methods such as a weekly rate that cater towards travelers in need of short-term accommodations for an extended period of time. Similar to limited and select service hotels, on-site amenities are normally limited and most extended stay hotels in Guyana lack an on-site restaurant.

Timeshare and destination clubs in Guyana
Guyana timeshare and destination clubs are a form of property ownership also referred to as a vacation ownership involving the purchase and ownership of an individual unit of accommodation for seasonal usage during a specified period of time. Timeshare resorts in Guyana often offer amenities similar that of a Full service hotel with on-site restaurant(s), swimming pools, recreation grounds, and other leisure-oriented amenities. Destination clubs of Guyana on the other hand may offer more exclusive private accommodations such as private houses in a neighborhood-style setting.

Motels in Guyana
A Guyana motel is a small-sized low-rise lodging establishment similar to that of a limited service hotel, but with direct access to individual rooms from the car park. Common during the 1950s and 1960s, motels were often located adjacent to a major road, where they were built on inexpensive land at the edge of towns or along stretches of highways. They are still useful in less populated areas of Guyana for driving travelers, but the more populated an area becomes the more hotels fill the need. Many of Guyana motels which remain in operation have joined national franchise chains, rebranding themselves as hotels, inns or lodges.

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Travelling and vacation in Guyana

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 / 5; -58.75

Co-operative Republic of Guyana
Flag of Guyana
Flag
Coat of arms of Guyana
Coat of arms
Motto: "One People, One Nation, One Destiny"
Anthem: Dear Land of Guyana, of Rivers and Plains
Location of Guyana
Capital
and largest city
Georgetown
 / 6.767; -58.167
Official languages English
Recognised regional languages
Vernacular
language
Guyanese Creole
Other languages
Ethnic groups (2002)
  • 43.45% Indian
  • 30.2% Black (African)
  • 16.73% Mixed
  • 9.16% Amerindian
  • 0.2% Portuguese
  • 0.19% Chinese
  • 0.06% European
  • 0.01% Others
Religion
  • 57.4% Christian
  • 28.4% Hindu
  • 7.2% Muslim
  • 0.5% Rastafarian
  • 0.1% Bahá'í
  • 1.3% Other
  • 0.9% Not Stated
  • 1.4% None
Demonym Guyanese
Government Unitary presidential republic
• President
David Granger
• Prime Minister
Moses Nagamootoo
Legislature National Assembly
Formation
• Dutch Guiana
1667–1814
• British Guiana
1814–1966
• Independence from the United Kingdom becoming Commonwealth Realm of Guyana
26 May 1966
• Republic
23 February 1970
Current constitution
6 October 1980
Area
• Total
214,970 km (83,000 sq mi) (85th)
• Water (%)
8.4
Population
• 2016 estimate
735,909 (165th)
• 2012 census
747,884
• Density
3.502/km (9.1/sq mi) (232nd or 8th least-densely populated in the world)
GDP (PPP) 2016 estimate
• Total
$6.093 billion
• Per capita
$7,919
GDP (nominal) 2016 estimate
• Total
$3.456 billion
• Per capita
$4,492
Gini (1998) 44.5
medium
HDI (2015) Steady 0.638
medium · 127th
Currency Guyanese dollar (GYD)
Time zone GYT (Guyana Time) (UTC-4)
Drives on the left
Calling code +592
ISO 3166 code GY
Internet TLD .gy

Guyana (pronounced /ɡˈɑːnə/ or /ɡˈænə/), officially the Co-operative Republic of Guyana, is a sovereign state on the northern mainland of South America. It is, however, included in the Caribbean Region due to its strong cultural, historical, and political ties with other Anglo Caribbean countries and the Caribbean Community (CARICOM). Guyana is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean to the north, Brazil to the south and southwest, Suriname to the east and Venezuela to the west. With 215,000 square kilometres (83,000 sq mi), Guyana is the fourth-smallest country on mainland South America after Uruguay, Suriname and French Guiana (an overseas region of France).

The region known as "the Guianas" consists of the large shield landmass north of the Amazon River and east of the Orinoco River known as the "land of many waters". Originally inhabited by several indigenous groups, Guyana was settled by the Dutch before coming under British control in the late 18th century. It was governed as British Guiana, with mostly a plantation style economy until the 1950s. It gained independence in 1966, and officially became a republic within the Commonwealth of Nations in 1970. The legacy of British rule is reflected in the country's political administration and diverse population, which includes Indian, African, Amerindian, and multiracial groups.

Guyana is the only South American nation in which English is the official language. The majority of the population, however, speak Guyanese Creole, an English-based creole language, as a first language. In addition to being part of the Anglophone Caribbean, Guyana is one of the few Caribbean countries that is not an island in the West Indies. CARICOM, of which Guyana is a member, is headquartered in Guyana's capital and largest city, Georgetown. In 2008, the country joined the Union of South American Nations as a founding member.

Guyana: Etymology

The name "Guyana" is derived from Guiana, the original name for the region that formerly included Guyana (British Guiana), Suriname (Dutch Guiana), French Guiana, and parts of Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, Guyana is derived from an Indigenous Amerindian language and means "land of many waters".

Guyana: History

A map of Dutch Guiana 1667–1814
Map of British Guiana

There are nine indigenous tribes residing in Guyana: the Wai Wai, Macushi, Patamona, Lokono, Kalina, Wapishana, Pemon, Akawaio and Warao. Historically the Lokono and Kalina tribes dominated Guyana. Although Christopher Columbus sighted Guyana during his third voyage (in 1498), the Dutch were the first to establish colonies: Essequibo (1616), Berbice (1627), and Demerara (1752). After the British assumed control in 1796, the Dutch formally ceded the area in 1814. In 1831 the three separate colonies became a single British colony known as British Guiana. In 1838, some Indians, who served as lower-caste indentured servants, were transported from Indian villages in South Asia to Guyana, where they intermixed with the Guyanese and formed half of today's Guyanese population.

Georgetown in 1823

Since its Independence in 1824 Venezuela has claimed the area of land to the west of the Essequibo River. Simón Bolívar wrote to the British government warning against the Berbice and Demerara settlers settling on land which the Venezuelans, as assumed heirs of Spanish claims on the area dating to the sixteenth century, claimed was theirs. In 1899 an international tribunal ruled the land belonged to Great Britain. The British territorial claim stemmed from Dutch involvement and colonization of the area also dating to the sixteenth century, which was ceded to the British.

Guyana achieved independence from the United Kingdom on 26 May 1966 and became a republic on 23 February 1970, remaining a member of the Commonwealth. The US State Department and the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), along with the British government, played a strong role in influencing political control in Guyana during this time. The American government supported Forbes Burnham during the early years of independence because Cheddi Jagan was identified as a Marxist. They provided secret financial support and political campaign advice to Burnham's People's National Congress, to the detriment of the Jagan-led People's Progressive Party, which was mostly supported by Guyanese of East Indian background.

In 1978, Guyana received international notice when 918 members of the American cult, Peoples Temple, died in a mass murder/suicide drinking cyanide laced Kool Aid. However, most of the suicides were by Americans and not Guyanese. More than 300 children were killed; the people were members of a group led by Jim Jones in Jonestown, the settlement which they had created. Jim Jones's bodyguards had earlier attacked people taking off at a small remote airstrip close to Jonestown, killing five people, including Leo Ryan, a US congressman.

In May 2008, President Bharrat Jagdeo was a signatory to the UNASUR Constitutive Treaty of the Union of South American Nations. Guyana has ratified the treaty.

Guyana: Geography

Rupununi Savannah

The territory controlled by Guyana lies between latitudes 1° and 9°N, and longitudes 56° and 62°W.

The country can be divided into five natural regions; a narrow and fertile marshy plain along the Atlantic coast (low coastal plain) where most of the population lives; a white sand belt more inland (hilly sand and clay region), containing most of Guyana's mineral deposits; the dense rain forests (Forested Highland Region) in the southern part of the country; the desert savannah in the southern west; and the smallest interior lowlands (interior savannah) consisting mostly of mountains that gradually rise to the Brazilian border.

Some of Guyana's highest mountains are Mount Ayanganna (2,042 metres or 6,699 feet), Monte Caburaí (1,465 metres or 4,806 feet) and Mount Roraima (2,772 metres or 9,094 feet – the highest mountain in Guyana) on the Brazil-Guyana-Venezuela tripoint border, part of the Pakaraima range. Mount Roraima and Guyana's table-top mountains (tepuis) are said to have been the inspiration for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's 1912 novel The Lost World. There are also many volcanic escarpments and waterfalls, including Kaieteur Falls which is believed to be the largest water drop in the world. North of the Rupununi River lies the Rupununi savannah, south of which lie the Kanuku Mountains.

The four longest rivers are the Essequibo at 1,010 kilometres (628 mi) long, the Courantyne River at 724 kilometres (450 mi), the Berbice at 595 kilometres (370 mi), and the Demerara at 346 kilometres (215 mi). The Corentyne river forms the border with Suriname. At the mouth of the Essequibo are several large islands, including the 145 km (90 mi) wide Shell Beach lies along the northwest coast, which is also a major breeding area for sea turtles (mainly leatherbacks) and other wildlife.

The local climate is tropical and generally hot and humid, though moderated by northeast trade winds along the coast. There are two rainy seasons, the first from May to mid-August, the second from mid-November to mid-January.

Guyana has one of the largest unspoiled rainforests in South America, some parts of which are almost inaccessible by humans. The rich natural history of Guyana was described by early explorers Sir Walter Raleigh and Charles Waterton and later by naturalists Sir David Attenborough and Gerald Durrell. In 2008, the BBC broadcast a three-part programme called Lost Land of the Jaguar which highlighted the huge diversity of wildlife, including undiscovered species and rare species such as the giant otter and harpy eagle.

In 2012, Guyana received a $45 million reward from Norway for its rainforest protection efforts. This stems from a 2009 agreement between the nations for a total of $250 million for protecting and maintaining the natural habitat. Thus far, the country has received $115 million of the total grant.

Guyana: Regions and Neighbourhood Councils

Guyana is divided into 10 regions:

No Region Area km Population (2012 Census) Population(2012 Census)
per km
1 Barima-Waini 20,339 26,941 1.32
2 Pomeroon-Supenaam 6,195 46,810 7.56
3 Essequibo Islands-West Demerara 3,755 107,416 28.61
4 Demerara-Mahaica 2,232 313,429 140.43
5 Mahaica-Berbice 4,190 49,723 11.87
6 East Berbice-Corentyne 36,234 109,431 3.02
7 Cuyuni-Mazaruni 47,213 20,280 0.43
8 Potaro-Siparuni 20,051 10,190 0.51
9 Upper Takutu-Upper Essequibo 57,750 24,212 0.42
10 Upper Demerara-Berbice 17,040 39,452 2.32
Guyana 214,999 747,884 3.48

The regions are divided into 27 neighbourhood councils.

Guyana: Boundary disputes

Guyana is in border disputes with both Suriname, which claims the area east of the left bank of the Corentyne River and the New River in southwestern Suriname, and Venezuela which claims the land west of the Essequibo River, once the Dutch colony of Essequibo as part of Venezuela's Guayana Essequiba. The maritime component of the territorial dispute with Suriname was arbitrated by the United Nations Convention on Law of the Sea, and a ruling was announced on 21 September 2007. The ruling concerning the Caribbean Sea north of both nations found both parties violated treaty obligations and declined to order any compensation to either party.

When the British surveyed British Guiana in 1840, they included the entire Cuyuni River basin within the colony. Venezuela did not agree with this as it claimed all lands west of the Essequibo River. In 1898, at Venezuela's request, an international arbitration tribunal was convened, and in 1899 the tribunal issued an award giving about 94% of the disputed territory to British Guiana. The arbitration was concluded, settled and accepted into International law by both Venezuela and the U.K. Venezuela brought up again the settled claim, during the 1960s cold war period, and during Guyana's Independence period. This issue is now governed by the Treaty of Geneva of 1966, which was signed by the Governments of Guyana, Great Britain and Venezuela, and Venezuela continues to claim Guayana Esequiba. Venezuela calls this region "Zona en Reclamación" (Reclamation Zone) and Venezuelan maps of the national territory routinely include it, drawing it in with dashed lines.

Specific small disputed areas involving Guyana are Ankoko Island with Venezuela; Corentyne River with Suriname; and Tigri Area or New River Triangle with Suriname. In 1967 a Surinamese survey team was found in the New River Triangle and was forcibly removed. In August 1969 a patrol of the Guyana Defence Force found a survey camp and a partially completed airstrip inside the triangle, and documented evidence of the Surinamese intention to occupy the entire disputed area. After an exchange of gunfire, the Surinamese were driven from the triangle.

Guyana: Environment and biodiversity

Satellite image of Guyana from 2004
Anomaloglossus beebei (Kaieteur), specific to the Guianas
The hoatzin is the national bird of Guyana

The following habitats have been categorised for Guyana: coastal, marine, littoral, estuarine palustrine, mangrove, riverine, lacustrine, swamp, savanna, white sand forest, brown sand forest, montane, cloud forest, moist lowland and dry evergreen scrub forests (NBAP, 1999). About 14 areas of biological interest have been identified as possible hotspots for a National Protected Area System. More than 80% of Guyana is still covered by forests, those forest also contains the worlds rarest orchids ranging from dry evergreen and seasonal forests to montane and lowland evergreen rain forests. These forests are home to more than a thousand species of trees. Guyana's tropical climate, unique geology, and relatively pristine ecosystems support extensive areas of species-rich rain forests and natural habitats with high levels of endemism. Approximately eight thousand species of plants occur in Guyana, half of which are found nowhere else.

Guyana has one of the highest levels of biodiversity in the world. Guyana, with 1,168 vertebrate species, 814 bird species, boasts one of the richest mammalian fauna assemblages of any comparably sized area in the world. The Guiana Shield region is little known and extremely rich biologically. Unlike other areas of South America, over 70% of the natural habitat remains pristine.

The rich natural history of British Guiana was described by early explorers Sir Walter Raleigh and Charles Waterton and later by naturalists Sir David Attenborough and Gerald Durrell.

In February 2004, the Government of Guyana issued a title to more than 1 million acres (4,000 km) of land in the Konashen Indigenous District declaring this land as the Konashen Community-Owned Conservation Area (COCA), to be managed by the Wai Wai. In doing so Guyana created the world's largest Community-Owned Conservation Area.

This important event followed a request made by the Wai Wai community to the government of Guyana and Conservation International Guyana (CIG) for assistance in developing a sustainable plan for their lands in Konashen. The three parties signed a Memorandum of Cooperation which outlines a plan for sustainable use of the Konashen COCA's biological resources, identifies threats to the area's biodiversity, and helps develop projects to increase awareness of the COCA as well as generate the income necessary to maintain its protected status.

The Konashen Indigenous District of Southern Guyana houses the headwaters of the Essequibo River, Guyana's principal water source, and drains the Kassikaityu, Kamoa, Sipu and Chodikar rivers. Southern Guyana is host to some of the most pristine expanses of evergreen forests in the northern part of South America. Most of the forests found here are tall, evergreen hill-land and lower montane forests, with large expanses of flooded forest along major rivers. Thanks to the very low human population density of the area, most of these forests are still intact. The Smithsonian Institution has identified nearly 2,700 species of plants from this region, representing 239 distinct families, and there are certainly additional species still to be recorded.

Such incredible diversity of plants supports even more impressive diversity of animal life, recently documented by a biological survey organised by Conservation International. The clean, unpolluted waters of the Essequibo watershed support a remarkable diversity of fish and aquatic invertebrates, and are home to giant otters, capybaras, and several species of caimans.

On land, large mammals, such as jaguars, tapirs, bush dogs, giant anteaters, and saki monkeys are still common. Over 400 species of birds have been reported from the region, and the reptile and amphibian faunas are similarly rich. The Konashen COCA forests are also home to countless species of insects, arachnids, and other invertebrates, many of which are still undiscovered and unnamed.

The Konashen COCA is relatively unique in that it contains a high level of biological diversity and richness that remains in nearly pristine condition; such places have become rare on earth. This fact has given rise to various non-exploitative, environmentally sustainable industries such as ecotourism, successfully capitalising on the biological wealth of the Konashen COCA with comparatively little enduring impact.

Guyana: World Heritage sites

Kaieteur Falls is the world's largest single-drop waterfall by volume

Guyana signed the Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage treaty in 1977, the first Caribbean country to do so. In the mid-1990s, Guyana began the process of selecting sites for World Heritage nomination, and three sites were considered: Kaieteur National Park, Shell Beach and Historic Georgetown. By 1997, work on Kaieteur National Park was started, and in 1998 work on Historic Georgetown was begun. To date, however, Guyana has not made a successful nomination.

Guyana submitted the Kaieteur National Park, including the Kaieteur Falls, to UNESCO as its first World Heritage Site nomination. The proposed area and surrounds have some of Guyana's most diversified life zones with one of the highest levels of endemic species found in South America. The Kaieteur Falls are the most spectacular feature of the park, falling a distance of 226 metres. The nomination of Kaieteur National Park as a World Heritage Site was not successful, primarily because the area was seen by the evaluators as being too small, especially when compared with the Central Suriname Nature Reserve that had just been nominated as a World Heritage Site (2000). The dossier was thus returned to Guyana for revision.

Guyana continues in its bid for a World Heritage Site. Work continues, after a period of hiatus, on the nomination dossier for Historic Georgetown. A tentative list indicating an intention to nominate Historic Georgetown was submitted to UNESCO in December 2004. In April 2005, two Dutch experts in conservation spent two weeks in Georgetown supervising architecture staff and students of the University of Guyana in a historic building survey of the selected area. This is part of the data collection for the nomination dossier.

Meanwhile, as a result of the Kaieteur National Park being considered too small, there is a proposal to prepare a nomination for a Cluster Site that will include the Kaieteur National Park, the Iwokrama Forest and the Kanuku Mountains. The Iwokrama rain forest, an area rich in biological diversity, has been described by Major General (Retired) Joseph Singh as "a flagship project for conservation." The Kanuku Mountains area is in a pristine state and is home to more than four hundred species of birds and other animals.

Guyana holds two of the World Wildlife Fund's Global 200 eco-regions, the Guianan and Guiana Highlands moist forests. It is also home to several endemic species including the greenheart tree.

Guyana: Landmarks

St George's Cathedral, Georgetown
St George's Anglican Cathedral
One of the tallest wooden church structures in the world and the second tallest wooden house of worship after the Tōdai-ji Temple in Japan.
Demerara Harbour Bridge
The world's fourth-longest floating bridge.
Berbice Bridge
The world's sixth-longest floating bridge.
Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Building
Houses the headquarters of the largest and most powerful economic union in the Caribbean.
Providence Stadium
Situated on Providence on the north bank of the Demerara River and built in time for the ICC World Cup 2007, it is the largest sports stadium in the country. It is also near the Providence Mall, forming a major spot for leisure in Guyana.
Guyana International Conference Centre
Presented as a gift from the People's Republic of China to the Government of Guyana. It is the only one of its kind in the country.
Stabroek Market
A large cast-iron colonial structure that looked like a statue was located next to the Demerara River.
City Hall
A beautiful wooden structure also from the colonial era.
Takutu River Bridge
A bridge across the Takutu River, connecting Lethem in Guyana to Bonfim in Brazil.Takutu River Bridge
Umana Yana
An Amerindian benab, that is a national monument built in 1972, for a meeting of the Foreign Ministers of the Non-Aligned nations (It was rebuilt in 2016).

Guyana: Economy

A tractor in a rice field on Guyana's coastal plain
Graphical depiction of Guyana's product exports in 28 colour-coded categories

The main economic activities in Guyana are agriculture (production of rice and Demerara sugar), bauxite mining, gold mining, timber, shrimp fishing and minerals. Chronic problems include a shortage of skilled labour and a deficient infrastructure. In 2008, the economy witnessed a 3% increase in growth amid the global economic crisis, grew an impressive 5.4% in 2011 and 3.7% in 2012.

Until recently, the government was juggling a sizeable external debt against the urgent need for expanded public investment. Low prices for key mining and agricultural commodities combined with troubles in the bauxite and sugar industries, had threatened the government's tenuous fiscal position and dimmed prospects for the future. However, the Guyanese economy has rebounded slightly and exhibited moderate economic growth since 1999, thanks to an expansion in the agricultural and mining sectors, a more favourable atmosphere for business initiatives, a more realistic exchange rate, fairly low inflation, and the continued support of international organisations.

The sugar industry, which accounts for 28% of all export earnings, is largely run by the company GuySuCo, which employs more people than any other industry. Many industries have a large foreign investment. For example, the mineral industry is heavily invested in by the American company Reynolds Metals and the British-Australian Rio Tinto's Rio Tinto Alcan subsidiary; the Korean/Malaysian Barama Company has a large stake in the logging industry.

The production of balatá (natural latex) was once big business in Guyana. Most of the balata bleeding in Guyana took place in the foothills of the Kanuku Mountains in the Rupununi. Early exploitation also took place in the North West District, but most of the trees in the area were destroyed by illicit bleeding methods that involved cutting down the trees rather than making incisions in them. Uses of balatá included the making of cricket balls, the temporary filling of troublesome tooth cavities, and the crafting of figurines and other decorative items (particularly by the Macushi people of the Kanuku mountains).

Major private sector organisations include the Private Sector Commission (PSC) and the Georgetown Chamber of Commerce & Industry (GCCI);

The government initiated a major overhaul of the tax code in early 2007. The Value Added Tax (VAT) was brought into effect, replacing six different taxes. Prior to the implementation of the VAT, it had been relatively easy to evade sales tax, and many businesses were in violation of tax code. Many businesses were very opposed to VAT introduction because of the extra paperwork required; however, the Government has remained firm on the VAT. By replacing several taxes with one flat tax rate, it will also be easier for government auditors to spot embezzlement. This was prevalent under the former PPP/C regime who authorised the VAT to be equal to 50% of the value of the good. While the adjustment to VAT has been difficult, it may improve day-to-day life because of the significant additional funds the government will have available for public spending.

President Bharrat Jagdeo had made debt relief a foremost priority of his administration. He was quite successful, getting US$800 million of debt written off by the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), in addition to millions more from other industrial nations. Jagdeo was lauded by IDB President Moreno for his strong leadership and negotiating skills in pursuing debt relief for Guyana and several other regional countries.

Guyana: Summary

Thatched roof houses in Guyana

Guyana: International and regional relations

Guyana: The Organisation of American States (OAS)

The Charter of the OAS was signed in Bogota in 1948 and was amended by several Protocols which were named after the city and the year in which the Protocol was signed, such as Managua in 1993 forming part of the name of the Protocol.

Guyana is listed as entering into the Inter – American system in 1991.

Guyana: Summits of the Americas

The last Summits of the Americas, the seventh, was held in Panama City, Panama in 2015 with the eight summit being held in Lima, Peru in 2018 according to the website of the Summits of Americas.

Guyana: Indigenous Leaders Summits of Americas (ILSA)

With Guyana having many groups of indigenous persons and given the geographical location of the country, recent developments in the oil and gas sector internationally and offshore, (such as Eliza I and II) the contributions of the Guyanese to the OAS with respect to this area, that is indigenous people may be significant going forward.

The position of the OAS with respect to indigenous persons appears to be developing over the years. The following statements appear to capture the position of the OAS with respect to the ILSA :"The "OAS has supported and participated in the organisation of Indigenous Leaders Summits of Americas (ILSA)" according to the OAS's website. The most recent "statement made by the Heads of State of the hemisphere was in the Declaration of Commitments of Port of Spain in 2009 – Paragraph 86" according to the OAS's website."

The Draft American Declaration of the Rights of the Indigenous Persons appears to be a working document. The last "Meeting for Negotiations in the Quest for Consensus on this area appeared to be Meeting Number (18) eighteen and is listed as being held in May 2015 according to the website.

Guyana: Agreements which impact on Financial Relationships

Guyana: The Double Taxation Relief (CARICOM) Treaty 1994

At a CARICOM Meeting, representatives of Trinidad and Tobago and Guyana, Kenneth Valley and Asgar Ally respectively signed The Double Taxation Relief (CARICOM) Treaty 1994 on 19 August 1994.

Earlier in the year, on 6 July 1994, representatives of eight (8) CARICOM countries signed similar agreements at Sherbourne Conference Centre, St. Michael, Barbados. The other countries whose representatives signed the treaties in Barbados prior to Guyana's signing of a similar treaty were: Antigua and Barbuda, Belize, Grenada, Jamaica, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines and Trinidad and Tobago.

This treaty covered taxes, residence, tax jurisdictions, capital gains, business profits, interest, dividends, royalties and other areas."

Guyana: FATCA

On 30 June 2014, Guyana signed a Model 1 agreement with the United States of America in relation to Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA). This Model 1 agreement includes a reference to the Tax Information Exchange Agreement (Clause 3) which was signed on 22 July 1992 in Georgetown, Guyana which was intended to exchange Tax information on an automatic basis.

Guyana: Demographics

Guyana's population density in 2005 (people per km)
A graph showing the population of Guyana from 1961 to 2003. The population decline in the 1980s can be clearly seen.

The chief majority (about 90%) of Guyana's 0.74 million population lives along a narrow coastal strip in which ranges from a width of 16 to 64 kilometres (10 to 40 mi) inland and which makes up approximately only 10% of the nation's total land area.

The present population of Guyana is racially and ethnically heterogeneous, with ethnic groups originating from India, Africa, Europe, and China, as well as indigenous or aboriginal peoples. Despite their diverse ethnic backgrounds, these groups share two common languages: English and Creole.

The largest ethnic group is the Indo-Guyanese (also known as East Indians), the descendants of indentured servants from India, who make up 43.5% of the population, according to the 2002 census. They are followed by the Afro-Guyanese, the descendants of slaves from Africa, who constitute 30.2%. Guyanese of mixed heritage make up 16.7%, while the indigenous peoples (known locally as Amerindians) make up 9.1%. The indigenous groups include the Arawaks, the Wai Wai, the Caribs, the Akawaio, the Arecuna, the Patamona, the Wapixana, the Macushi and the Warao. The two largest groups, the Indo-Guyanese and Afro-Guyanese, have experienced some racial tension.

The majority of Indo-Guyanese are descended from indentured servants who came from Bhojpuri-speaking areas of North India. A sizable minority are South Indian, largely of Tamil and Telugu descent.

The distribution pattern in the 2002 census was similar to those of the 1980 and 1991 censuses, but the share of the two main groups has declined. Indo-Guyanese made up 51.9% of the total population in 1980, but by 1991 this had fallen to 48.6%, and then to 43.5% in the 2002 census. Those of African descent increased slightly from 30.8% to 32.3% during the first period (1980 and 1991) before falling to 30.2% in the 2002 census. With small growth in the overall population, the decline in the shares of the two larger groups has resulted in the relative increase of shares of the multiracial and Amerindian groups. The Amerindian population rose by 22,097 people between 1991 and 2002. This represents an increase of 47.3% or annual growth of 3.5%. Similarly, the multiracial population increased by 37,788 persons, representing a 43.0% increase or annual growth rate of 3.2% from the base period of 1991 census. The number of Portuguese (4.3% of the population in 1891) has been declining constantly over the decades.

Guyana: Largest cities

Largest cities and towns of Guyana
Rank Name Region Population
1 Georgetown Demerara-Mahaica 235,017
2 Linden Upper Demerara-Berbice 44,690
3 New Amsterdam East Berbice-Corentyne 35,039
4 Anna Regina Pomeroon-Supenaam 12,448
5 Bartica Cuyuni-Mazaruni 11,157
6 Skeldon East Berbice-Corentyne 5,859
7 Rosignol Mahaica-Berbice 5,782
8 Mahaica (village) Demerara-Mahaica 4,867
9 Parika Essequibo Islands-West Demerara 4,081
10 Vreed en Hoop Demerara-Mahaica 3,073

Guyana: Language

English is the official language of Guyana and is used for education, government, media, and services. The vast majority of the population speaks Guyanese Creole, an English-based creole with slight African and East Indian influence, as their native tongue. In addition, Cariban languages (Akawaio, Wai-Wai, and Macushi) are spoken by a small minority, while Indic languages are retained for cultural and religious reasons.

Guyana: Religion

Religion in Guyana, 2002
Religion Percent
Christianity
57.4%
Hinduism
28.4%
Islam
7.2%
Other religions
1.9%
Unaffiliated
2.3%

According to a 2002 nationwide census on religious affiliation, 57.4% of the population was Christian, 28.4% was Hindu, 7.2% was Muslim, 1.9% adhered to other religions, while 2.3% of the population did not profess any.

Among Christians, most are Protestants (34.8%) or other Christian (20.8%), but there is also a minority of Roman Catholics (7.1%). Among Hindu, Vaishnavism is the major tradition. Among Muslims, Sunni are in the majority, while there are also Shia and Ahmadiyya minorities. Among other religions, the Rastafari movement, Buddhism, and the Baha'i Faith are the most popular.

Guyana: Government and politics

The State House, Guyana's presidential residence
The Supreme Court of Guyana
Guyana's parliament building since 1834

The politics of Guyana takes place in a framework of a presidential representative democratic republic, whereby the President of Guyana is both head of state and head of government, and of a multi-party system. Executive power is exercised by the President and the Government. Legislative power is vested in both the President and the National Assembly of Guyana.

Historically, politics are a source of tension in the country, and violent riots have often broken out during elections. During the 1970s and 1980s, the political landscape was dominated by the People's National Congress.

In 1992, the first "free and fair" elections were overseen by former United States President Jimmy Carter, and the People's Progressive Party has led the country since. The two parties are principally organised along ethnic lines and as a result often clash on issues related to the allocation of resources.

General Elections were held on 28 November 2011, which resulted in a re-election of the People's Progressive Party (PPP) and installation of that party's presidential candidate Donald Ramotar as President.

On 11 May 2015, early general elections were held, resulting in a victory for A Partnership For National Unity-Alliance For Change (APNU-AFC) Coalition party. APNU-AFC, a multi-ethnic, multi-party coalition, won a majority, 33 of 65 seats in the National Assembly. On 16 May 2015, retired army general David A. Granger was sworn in as the eighth Executive President of the Co-operative Republic of Guyana.

Guyana: Public procurement

Public procurement in Guyana is overseen by the Public Procurement Commission, appointed under the Public Procurement Commission Act 2003. Due to lengthy delay in identifying and agreeing commission members, the commission was not appointed until 2016.

Guyana: Military

The Guyana Defence Force (GDF) is the military service of Guyana.

Guyana: Human rights

Homosexual acts are illegal in Guyana.

Guyana: Infrastructure and telecommunications

Guyana: Transport

Cross-border bridge from Guyana to Brazil near Lethem

There are a total of 187 kilometres (116 mi) of railway, all dedicated to ore transport. There are 7,969 kilometres (4,952 mi) of highway, of which 591 kilometres (367 mi) are paved. Navigable waterways extend 1,077 kilometres (669 mi), including the Berbice, Demerara, and Essequibo rivers. There are ports at Georgetown, Port Kaituma, and New Amsterdam. There are two international airports (Cheddi Jagan International Airport, Timehri and Eugene F. Correira International Airport, Ogle); along with about 90 airstrips, nine of which have paved runways. Guyana, Suriname and the Falkland Islands are the only three regions in South America which drive on the left.

Guyana: Electricity

The electricity sector in Guyana is dominated by Guyana Power and Light (GPL), the state-owned vertically integrated utility. Although the country has a large potential for hydroelectric and bagasse-fueled power generation, most of its 226 MW of installed capacity correspond to inefficient thermoelectric diesel-engine driven generators.

Several initiatives are in place to improve energy access in the hinterland.

Guyana: Water supply and sanitation

Key issues in the water and sanitation sector in Guyana are poor service quality, a low level of cost recovery and low levels of access. A high-profile management contract with the British company Severn Trent was cancelled by the government in February 2007. In 2008 the public utility Guyana Water Inc implemented a Turnaround Plan (TAP) to reduce non-revenue water and to financially consolidate the utility. NRW reduction is expected to be 5% per annum for the three-year period of the plan, A midterm review is now due to examine the success of the TAP.

Guyana: Telecommunications

Per the CIA World Factbook:

Guyana: Telephone system

  • Telephones : 154,200 main telephone lines (2012)
  • Telephones – mobile cellular: 600,000+ (2014)
  • Domestic: microwave radio relay network for trunk lines; fixed-line teledensity is about 20 per 100 persons; many areas still lack fixed-line telephone services; mobile-cellular teledensity reached 70 per 100 persons in 2011
  • International: country code – 592; tropospheric scatter to Trinidad; satellite earth station – 1 Intelsat (Atlantic Ocean)

Guyana Telephone & Telegraph (GT&T) is the main mobile phone provider

Digicel is also present in Guyana since 2007 providing mobile service for its citizens

Guyana: Radio broadcast stations

  • AM 3, FM 6, shortwave 1 (1998)
  • FM 88.5 – Rock FM (New Amsterdam, Berbice)
  • FM 89.1 – NTN Radio (Georgetown, Demerara)
  • FM 89.3 – Radio Guyana Inc. (Essequibo re-transmission frequency)
  • FM 89.7 – Radio Guyana Inc. (Berbice re-transmission frequency)
  • FM 89.5 – Radio Guyana Inc. (Georgetown, Demerara – Head Office)
  • FM 93.1 – Real FM (Georgetown, Demerara)
  • FM 94.1 – Boom FM (Georgetown, Demerara)
  • FM 98.1 – Hot FM (Georgetown, Demerara)
  • FM 100.1 – Fresh FM (Georgetown, Demerara)
  • FM 104.3 – Power FM (Linden, Demerara)

Guyana: Television broadcast stations

Television broadcast was officially introduced to Guyana in 1991.

  • 15 (1 public station (channel 11); 14 private stations which relay US satellite services) (1997)

Of which are; L.R.T.V.S-Little Rock Television Station channel 10 (New Amsterdam, Berbice) H.G.P-Halagala General Productions television (Beterverwagting Village, Demerara) RCA Television charity, Essequibo coast

Guyana: Satellite television

  • Satellite television services are offered by DirecTV Caribbean and E-Networks.

Guyana: Internet system

  • Internet country code: .gy
  • Internet hosts: 6,218 (2008)
  • Internet users: 270,200 (2014)

Guyana: Health

Life expectancy at birth is estimated to be 67.39 years for both males and females in 2012. The PAHO/ WHO Global Health Report 2014 (using statistics of 2012) ranked the country as having the highest suicide rate in the world, with a mortality rate of 44.2 per 100,000 inhabitants. According to 2011 estimates from the WHO, HIV prevalence is 1.2% of the teen/adult population (ages 15–49). Although Guyana's health profile falls short in comparison with many of its Caribbean neighbours, there has been remarkable progress since 1988, and the Ministry of Health is working to upgrade conditions, procedures, and facilities.

Guyana: Education

Queens College Guyana.jpg

Guyana's educational system is considered to be among the best in the Caribbean, but it deteriorated significantly in the 1980s, because of inadequate funding and emigration of many highly educated citizens. Although the education system recovered in the 1990s, it still does not produce the quality of educated students necessary for Guyana to modernise its workforce. The country lacks a critical mass of expertise in many of the disciplines and activities on which it depends.

The educational system does not sufficiently focus on the training of Guyanese in science and technology, technical and vocational subjects, business management, or computer sciences. The Guyanese education system is modelled on the former British education system. Students are expected to take the NGSA (National Grade Six Assessment) for entrance into high school in grade 7. They take the CXC at the end of high school. Schools have introduced the CAPE exams which all other Caribbean countries have introduced. The A-level system, inherited from the British era, has all but disappeared and is offered only in a few schools.

Further adding to the problems of the educational system, many of the better-educated professional teachers have emigrated to other countries over the past two decades, mainly because of low pay, lack of opportunities and crime.

Guyana: Culture

Holidays
1 January New Year's Day
Spring Youman Nabi
23 February Republic Day / Mashramani
March Phagwah
March / April Good Friday
March / April Easter Sunday
5 May Indian Arrival Day
26 May Independence Day
First Monday in July CARICOM Day
1 August Emancipation Day
October / November Diwali
25 December Christmas
26 or 27 December Boxing Day

Guyana's culture is very similar to that of the English-speaking Caribbean, and has historically been tied to the English-speaking Caribbean as part of the British Empire when it became a possession in the nineteenth century. Guyana is a founding member of the Caricom (Caribbean Community) economic bloc and also the home of the Bloc's Headquarters, the CARICOM Secretariat.

Guyana's geographical location, its sparsely populated rain-forest regions, and its substantial Amerindian population differentiate it from English-speaking Caribbean countries. Its blend of Indo-Guyanese (East Indian) and Afro-Guyanese (African) cultures gives it similarities to Trinidad and distinguishes it from other parts of the Americas. Guyana shares similar interests with the islands in the West Indies, such as food, festive events, music, sports, etc.

Guyana plays international cricket as a part of the West Indies cricket team, and the Guyana team plays first-class cricket against other nations of the Caribbean. In March and April 2007 Guyana co-hosted the Cricket World Cup 2007. In addition to its CARICOM membership, Guyana is a member of CONCACAF, the international football federation for North and Central America and the Caribbean.

Events include Mashramani (Mash), Phagwah (Holi), and Deepavali (Diwali).

Guyana: Wildlife

Among the birds found on Guyana is Cock of the rock (Rupicola rupicola).

Guyana: Sports

Providence Stadium as seen from the East Bank Highway

The major sports in Guyana are cricket (Guyana is part of the West Indies as defined for international cricket purposes), basketball, football and volleyball. Minor sports include softball cricket (beach cricket), field hockey, netball, rounders, lawn tennis, table tennis, boxing, squash, rugby, horse racing and a few others.

Guyana played host to international cricket matches as part of the 2007 Cricket World Cup (CWC 2007). The new 15,000-seat Providence Stadium, also referred to as Guyana National Stadium, was built in time for the World Cup and was ready for the beginning of play on 28 March. At the first international game of CWC 2007 at the stadium, Lasith Malinga of the Sri Lankan team took four wickets in four consecutive deliveries.

For international football purposes, Guyana is part of CONCACAF. The highest league in their club system is the GFF National Super League.

Guyana also has five courses for horse racing.

Guyana: See also

  • Index of Guyana-related articles
  • LGBT rights in Guyana
  • List of international rankings
  • Outline of Guyana

Guyana: References

  1. "CHAPTER II: POPULATION COMPOSITION" (PDF). StatisticsGuyana. Government of Guyana.
  2. http://www.statisticsguyana.gov.gy/pubs/Chapter2_Population_Composition.pdf
  3. "The World Factbook: Guyana". CIA. Retrieved 6 January 2014.
  4. Guyana 2012 Census Archived 6 August 2014 at the Wayback Machine. GeoHive– Guyana. Retrieved 2 August 2012.
  5. "Guyana". International Monetary Fund. Retrieved 18 April 2013.
  6. "GINI index (World Bank estimate)". World Bank. Archived from the original on 9 February 2015. Retrieved 22 July 2015.
  7. "2016 Human Development Report" (PDF). United Nations Development Programme. 2016. Retrieved 21 March 2017.
  8. Wells, John C. (1990). Longman pronunciation dictionary. Harlow, England: Longman. ISBN 0-582-05383-8. entry "Guyana"
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  10. "Independent States in the World". state.gov.
  11. "Guyana". Oxford Dictionaries. Retrieved 9 May 2015.
  12. "Ministry of Amerindian Affairs – Georgetown, Guyana". Amerindian.gov.gy. Retrieved 30 March 2014.
  13. "South America 1744–1817 by Sanderson Beck".
  14. US Declassified Documents (1964–1968). guyana.org Archived 12 February 2007 at the Wayback Machine.
  15. Rowe, Mark (14 November 2004). "South America: Do the continental: The best of what's new; spectacular waterfalls, forgotten cities, pre-Inca trails". The Independent. p. Features, page 3.
  16. Bureau of Statistics – Guyana Archived 2 September 2012 at WebCite, CHAPTER III: POPULATION REDISTRIBUTION AND INTERNAL MIGRATION, Table 3.4: Population Density, Guyana: 1980–2002
  17. Guyana – Government Information Agency, National Profile. gina.gov.gy Archived 14 August 2007 at the Wayback Machine.
  18. "Government of Guyana, Statistics" (PDF). Retrieved 2 May 2010.
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  20. "Tribunal decision tentatively set for August". Archived from the original on 6 April 2009. Retrieved 2007-07-09. . guyanachronicle.com, Archives for 17 June 2007
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  23. Foreign affairs minister reiterates Guyana's territorial sovereignty. CaribbeanNetNews.com (17 February 2010).
  24. POINT OF CLARIFICATION: Guyana clears air on Suriname border talk. Caribbean News Agency (17 February 2010).
  25. "official site of the Permanent Court of Arbitration". Pca-cpa.org. Archived from the original on 8 February 2013. Retrieved 2 May 2010.
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  29. Rodrigues-Birkett, Carolyn (24 October 2008). "There is no agreement recognizing Suriname's sovereignty over the Corentyne River". Stabroek Newspaper. Retrieved 15 December 2008.
  30. "Biodiversity in the Konashen Community-Owned Conservation Area, Guyana" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 December 2010. Retrieved 2 May 2010.
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  33. OEA; OAS (1 August 2009). "OAS – Organization of American States: Democracy for peace, security, and development". www.oas.org.
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  35. Summit Americas Archived 29 November 2014 at the Wayback Machine.
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  37. "Indigenous Peoples". www.summit-americas.org.
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  39. "IRD Trinidad and Tobago – CARICOM Treaties" (PDF). ird.gov.tt.
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  51. Damoiseau, Robert (2003) Eléments de grammaire comparée français-créole guyanais Ibis rouge, Guyana, ISBN 2-84450-192-3
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  71. Service, K News (11 July 2013). "Guyana Horse Racing Authority continues its drive to regularize the sport". Kaiteur News. Retrieved 27 November 2013.

Guyana: Further reading

  • ISBN 978-1-892329-00-4. OCLC 51089880. Retrieved 7 January 2010.
  • ISBN 978-0-7091-2972-1. OCLC 650259. Retrieved 7 January 2010.
  • Donald Haack, Bush Pilot in Diamond Country
  • Hamish MacInnes, Climb to the Lost World (1974)
  • Andrew Salkey, Georgetown Journal (1970)
  • Marion Morrison, Guyana (Enchantment of the World Series)
  • Bob Temple, Guyana
  • Noel C. Bacchus, Guyana Farewell: A Recollection of Childhood in a Faraway Place
  • Marcus Colchester, Guyana: Fragile Frontier
  • Matthew French Young, Guyana: My Fifty Years in the Guyanese Wilds
  • Margaret Bacon, Journey to Guyana
  • Father Andrew Morrison SJ, Justice: The Struggle For Democracy in Guyana 1952–1992
  • Daly, Vere T. (1974). The Making of Guyana. Macmillan. ISBN 978-0-333-14482-4. OCLC 1257829. Retrieved 7 January 2010.
  • D. Graham Burnett, Masters of All They Surveyed: Exploration, Geography and a British El Dorado
  • Ovid Abrams, Metegee: The History and Culture of Guyana
  • Waugh, Evelyn (1934). Ninety-two days: The account of a tropical journey through British Guiana and part of Brazil. New York: Farrar & Rinehart. OCLC 3000330. Retrieved 7 January 2010.
  • Gerald Durrell, Three Singles To Adventure
  • Cheddi Jagan. The West on Trial: My Fight for Guyana's Freedom
  • Cheddi Jagan. My Fight For Guyana's Freedom: With Reflections on My Father by Nadira Jagan-Brancier.
  • Colin Henfrey, Through Indian Eyes: A Journey Among the Indian Tribes of Guiana.
  • Stephen G. Rabe, US Intervention in British Guiana: A Cold War Story.
  • Charles Waterton, Wanderings in South America.
  • David Attenborough, Zoo Quest to Guiana (Lutterworth Press, London: 1956).
  • John Gimlette, Wild Coast: Travels on South America's Untamed Edge, 2011.
  • Clementi, Cecil (1915). The Chinese in British Guiana (PDF). Georgetown, British Guiana: The Argosy Company Limited. Retrieved 27 October 2015.
  • Office of the President, Republic of Guyana (official website).
  • Patrick Carpen writes about his native country, Guyana
  • Petroleum exploration in Guyana
  • Parliament of the Cooperative Republic of Guyana (official website).
  • Wikimedia Atlas of Guyana
  • Outsourcing in Guyana from news publication, Nearshore Americas.
  • Geographic data related to Guyana at OpenStreetMap
  • "Guyana". The World Factbook. Central Intelligence Agency.
  • Country Profile from the BBC News.
  • Guyana from the Encyclopædia Britannica.
  • Guyana at UCB Libraries GovPubs.
  • (in Spanish) Derechos Venezolanos de Soberania en el Esequibo, Ministerio del Poder Popular para Relaciones Exteriores.
  • Venezuelan rights of sovereignty in the Essequibo, Ministry of Popular Power for Foreign Affairs (translated by Google).
  • Guyana at DMOZ
  • The State of the World's Midwifery, Guyana Country Profile.
  • Key Development Forecasts for Guyana from International Futures.
  • Guyana Crime Reports-crowdsourced
Source of information: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. We're not responsible for the content of this article and your use of this information. Disclaimer
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