Siquijor
For the town, see Siquijor, Siquijor.
Siquijor
Province
Province of Siquijor
Island seascape
Island seascape
Flag of Siquijor
Flag
Official seal of Siquijor
Seal
Location in the Philippines
Location in the Philippines
Coordinates:  / 9.2; 123.5  / 9.2; 123.5
Country Philippines
Region Central Visayas (Region VII)
Established 17 September 1971
Provincial Capital Siquijor
Government
• Type Sangguniang Panlalawigan
Governor Zaldy Villa (LP)
• Vice Governor Fernando Avanzado
Provincial Board
Area   
• Total 337.49 km (130.31 sq mi)
Area rank 79th of 81
Elevation 628 m (2,060 ft)
Population (2010 census)
• Total 91,066
• Density 270/km (700/sq mi)
Voter (2013) 64,804
Demonym(s) Siquijodnon
Divisions
Component cities 0
Municipalities
Districts Lone district of Siquijor
Time zone PST (UTC+8)
ZIP code 6225–6230
IDD : area code +63 (0)35
Income class 5th class
PSGC 076100000
Website www.siquijor.gov.ph

Siquijor /sɪkɪˈhɔː/ (Cebuano: Lalawigan sa Siquijor, Filipino: Lalawigan ng Siquijor) is a fifth income class island province of the Philippines located in the Central Visayas region. Its capital is the municipality also named Siquijor. To the northwest of Siquijor are Cebu and Negros, to the northeast is Bohol and to the south, across the Bohol Sea, is the island of Mindanao.

Siquijor is the third smallest province in the country, in terms of population as well as land area (after Camiguin and Batanes). For a time it was part of Negros Oriental.

During the Spanish colonial period of the Philippines, the Spaniards called the island Island of Fire (Spanish: Isla del Fuego). Siquijor is commonly associated with mystic traditions that the island's growing tourism industry capitalizes on.

History

Spanish era

The island was first sighted by the Spaniards in 1565 during Miguel López de Legazpi's expedition. The Spaniards called the island Isla del Fuego or "Island of Fire", because the island gave off an eerie glow, which came from the great swarms of fireflies that gathered in the numerous molave trees on the island. Esteban Rodríguez of the Legazpi expedition led the first Spaniards to discover the island. He was captain of a small party that left Legazpi's camp in Bohol to explore the nearby islands which are now called Pamilican, Siquijor, and Negros.

The island, along with the rest of the archipelago, was subsequently annexed to the Spanish Empire. Founded in 1783 under the administration of secular clergymen, Siquijor became the first municipality as well as the first parish to be established on the island. Siquijor was, from the beginning, administered by the Diocese of Cebu. As for civil administration, Siquijor was under Bohol since the province had its own governor. The first Augustinian Recollect priest arrived in Siquijor in 1794. Several years later, a priest of the same order founded the parishes of Larena (initially called Can‑oan), Lazi (formerly Tigbawan), San Juan (Makalipay), and Maria (Cang‑meniao). With the exception of Enrique Villanueva, the other five municipalities were established as parishes in 1877. From 1854 to 1892, Siquijor became part of the province of Negros Oriental, and became a sub-province in 1901.

American rule and World War II

At the turn of the century, Spain ceded the Philippines to the United States of America with the Treaty of Paris that ended the Spanish–American War. Siquijor island felt the presence of American rule when a unit of the American Cavalry Division came and stayed for sometime. The American Military Governor in Manila appointed James Fugate, a scout with the California Volunteers of the U.S. Infantry, to oversee and to implement the organization and development programs in Siquijor Island. Governor Fugate stayed for 16 years as lieutenant governor of Siquijor.

While it was not at the center of military action, Siquijor was not spared by World War II. Imperial Japanese detachments occupied the island between 1942 and 1943, announcing their arrival on the island with heavy shelling. At the outbreak of the war, Siquijor was a sub-province of Negros Oriental, headed by Lieutenant Governor Nicolas Parami. Refusing to pledge allegiance to the Japanese forces, Lt. Governor Parami was taken by Japanese soldiers from his residence at Poo, Lazi one evening and brought to the military headquarters in Larena. He was never heard from again. On November 10, 1942, Japanese warships started shelling Lazi from Cang-abas Point. In Lazi, a garrison was established in the old Home Economics Building of the Central School. Filipino guerrillas engaged in sabotage and the interaction during this time to cause havoc on the Japanese lives and properties.

During this period, Siquijor was briefly governed by Shunzo Suzuki, a Japanese civilian appointed by the Japanese forces until he was assassinated in October 1942 by the guerrilla forces led by Iluminado Jumawanin, of Caipilan, Siquijor. Mamor Fukuda took control of Siquijor from June 1943 until the Japanese forces abandoned the island when the liberation forces came in 1944. In 1943, the Japanese puppet government appointed Sebastian Monera of San Juan as Governor of Siquijor. His administration however was cut short when he was executed, presumably by Filipino guerrillas operating in the mountains of Siquijor.

On September 30, 1943, the United States submarine USS Bowfin (SS-287) delivered supplies to the people of Siquijor and evacuated people from the island.

On February 21, 1945, the destroyer USS Renshaw (DD-499), part of Task Unit 78.7.6, was escorting a convoy of about 50 various landing ships with 12 other escorts. At 10:59, Renshaw was attacked by a Japanese midget submarine off the coast of Siquijor, which caused extensive damage to the ship and killed 19 of the crew.

In mid-1945, local Filipino soldiers and officers under the 7th, 71st, 75th and 76th Infantry Division of the Philippine Commonwealth Army arrived, and alongside recognized guerrilla fighter groups, liberated Siquijor.

Independence

Siquijor became an independent province on September 17, 1971, by virtue of Republic Act 6398. The capital, formerly Larena, was transferred to the municipality of Siquijor in 1972 by Proclamation No. 1075.

Geography

Siquijor
Map of Siquijor

Siquijor is an island province in the Visayas. It lies southeast from Cebu and Negros across Cebu Strait (also called Bohol Strait) and southwest from Bohol. Panglao Island which is part of Bohol province has a similar composition of the soil which is found throughout the whole island of Siquijor. With a land area of 338 square kilometres (131 sq mi) and a coastline 102 kilometres (63 mi) long, Siquijor is the third smallest province of the Philippines.

Topography

The island lies about 19 kilometres (12 mi) east of the nearest point on southern Negros, 25 kilometres (16 mi) southeast of Cebu, 30 kilometres (19 mi) southwest of Bohol, and 45 kilometres (28 mi) north of Zamboanga Peninsula of Mindanao. It is predominantly hilly and in many places the hills reach the sea, producing precipitous cliffs. At the center, Mount Malabahoc (locally known as Mount Bandila‑an) reaches about 628 metres (2,060 ft) in elevation, the highest point on the island. Three marine terraces can be roughly traced especially in the vicinity of Tag‑ibo on the southwestern part of the island, a barrio of San Juan municipality from the seacoast up into the central part.

Siquijor is a coralline island, and fossils of the giant clam tridacna are often encountered in the plowed inland fields. On the hilltops there are numerous shells of the molluscan species presently living in the seas around the island. Siquijor was probably formed quite recently, geologically speaking. The ocean depths between Siquijor and Bohol and Mindanao are in the neighborhood of 640 metres (350 fathoms; 2,100 feet).

Climate

Siquijor has two different climates, dominated by Am. All climate is within Coronas climate type IV, characterised by not very pronounced maximum rainfall with a short dry season from one to three months and a wet season of nine to ten months. The dry season starts in February and lasts through April sometimes extending to mid‑May.

Five of the municipalities have significant rainfall most months of the year, with a short dry season that has little effect. This location is classified as Am (tropical monsoon climate) by Köppen–Geiger climate classification system. The average annual temperature in Siquijor is 27.6 °C, with variation throughout the year less than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 deg F). The precipitation about varies 165 millimetres (6 in) between the driest month and the wettest month, with the average rainfall 1,600 millimetres (63 in) or less.

The municipality Lazi has a significant amount of rainfall during the year. This is true even for the driest month. According to Köppen and Geiger, this climate is classified as Af (tropical rainforest climate). In a year, the average rainfall is 1,655 millimetres (65 in).

Administrative division

Siquijor (province) comprises 6 municipalities. Siquijor (municipality) is the capital and most important port.

PSGC Municipality Population ±% p.a. Area PD(2010)
(2010) (2007) km sq mi /km /sq mi
076101000 Enrique Villanueva 6.6% 5,972 5,878 0.58% 28.60 11.04 210 540
076102000 Larena 14.2% 12,931 12,550 1.09% 49.81 19.23 260 670
076103000 Lazi 22.0% 20,024 19,440 1.08% 70.64 27.27 280 730
076104000 Maria 14.7% 13,383 12,974 1.14% 53.37 20.61 250 650
076105000 San Juan 14.9% 13,525 13,180 0.94% 44.37 17.13 300 780
076106000 Siquijor 27.7% 25,231 23,673 2.35% 80.70 31.16 310 800
TOTAL 91,066 87,695 1.38% 337.49 130.31 270 700
Provincial capital Municipality

Demographics

Population census of Siquijor
Year Pop. ±% p.a.
1960 59,535 -
1970 63,050 +0.57%
1980 70,450 +1.12%
1990 73,932 +0.48%
1995 73,756 −0.04%
2000 81,598 +2.19%
2007 87,695 +1.00%
2010 91,066 +1.38%
Source: National Statistics Office

According to the 2010 census, it has a population of 91,066. The same census also states that Siquijor has 17,351 households with an average household size of 5.2 persons. The average annual growth rate between 2000 and 2010 was 1.10%, lower than the national growth rate of 1.90% for the same period.

In the 2013 election, it had 64,804 registered voters, meaning that 71% of the population are aged 18 and over.

The main spoken language in the island province is Cebuano, with English often used as a second language. Filipino is understood and used only in response to one who speaks it, but it is rarely used in everyday conversation. Some Spanish words are spoken and understood.

95% of the island's residents belong to the Catholic Church, while the remainder belong to various other Christian churches.

Education

The literacy rate of 92.5% is one of the highest in the country.

Tourism

Siquijor's long-time reputation as a place of magic and sorcery both attracts and repulses visitors. Siquijor is also well known for its festivals that focus on healing rituals where incantations are sung while the old folks make potions out of herbs, roots, insects and tree barks. In hushed talks, locals would share a story or two about folk legends pointing to the existence of witchcraft and witches on the island.

Among the many attractions are the beaches, caves, waterfalls, Bandila‑an Natural Park, and butterfly sanctuary. White sand beaches make up most of the 102-kilometer coastline of Siquijor.

The coral reefs ringing the island offer some of the best diving in the Philippines for snorkelers and scuba divers. Dive courses are conducted by several dive operators on the island in version of PADI, CMAS* and NAUI. Siquijor was declared a marine visitor arrivals among the three provinces in Region VII.

Transportation

The island of Siquijor has 3 sea ports capable of servicing cargo and passenger sea crafts, and an airfield capable of handling smaller and mostly privately owned airplanes.

Gallery

Notes

  1. Lore – A folk legend also has it that many years ago, when the magical island of Siquijor was still nowhere on the face of the earth, a great storm engulfed the Visayan region, and a strong earthquake shook the earth and sea. Amidst the lightning and thunder arose an island from the depths of the ocean's womb which came to be known as the island of Siquijor, hence the name Isla del Fuego, or "Island of Fire." Oddly enough, in modern times, highland farmers have found giant shells under their farm plots, supporting the theory that Siquijor is indeed an island that rose from the sea.
  2. After Siquijor, Fugate became governor of Sulu province, where he was murdered in 1938.

References

  1. "Province". Quezon City, Philippines: Department of the Interior and Local Government. Retrieved 30 May 2013.
  2. "Province: Siquijor". PSA. Philippines: National Statistical Coordination Board. Retrieved 8 January 2016.
  3. "Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay: as of May 1, 2010" (PDF). 2010 Census of Population and Housing. National Statistics Office. Retrieved 1 April 2013.
  4. "2013 National and Local Elections Statistics" (PDF). Commission on Elections. 2015.
  5. "Siquijor History"
  6. .
  7. Helgason, Guðmundur "Bowfin (SS-287)" Allied Warships uboat.net
  8. .
  9. Republic Act No. 6398 of 17 September 1971 An Act separating the subprovince of Siquijor from the province of Oriental Negros and establishing it as an independent province. Retrieved 8 February 2016.
  10. Presidential Proclamation No. 1075 (s.1972) of 12 September 1972 Proclaiming the municipality of Siquijor as the capital of the province of Siquijor. Retrieved 8 February 2016.
  11. .
  12. "Population and Annual Growth Rates by Province, City and Municipality: Central Visayas: 1995, 2000 and 2007" (PDF). National Statistics Office. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 June 2011.
  13. .
  14. .
  15. Map "Tourist Spots: Province of Siquijor" GEOPLAN Cebu Foundation
  16. .
  17. .
  18. gmanews.tv, Butterfly sanctuary inaugurated in Siquijor
  19. .

Bibliography

  • Agribusiness and Marketing Assistance Division (2011). Siquijor Provincial Agricultural Profile. Mandaue City, Cebu: Department of Agriculture, Regional Field Unit-7. Retrieved 29 April 2016.
  • Bolido, Linda. "Who's afraid of Siquijor?". Philippine Daily Inquirer. Archived from the original on 24 October 2004. Retrieved 29 April 2016.
  • Lato, Cris Evert and Tagalog, Jun (17 October 2007). "NEDA: Tourism drove economy". Cebu Daily News. Retrieved 29 April 2016.
  • Coronas, José (1920). The Climate and Weather of the Philippines, 1903 – 1918. Manila, Philippines: Bureau of Printing. Retrieved 29 April 2016.
  • De la Peña, Mario (10 February 2009). "Island butterfly sanctuary now open for tourists". Philippine Information Agency. Retrieved 29 April 2016.
  • Department of Tourism - Central Visayas (2011). Siquijor Tourism Situation, 2010-2011 (PDF). Retrieved 29 April 2016.
  • Hackett, Bob and Kingsepp, Sander (2006). Sensuikan! Operational Histories of Japanese Submarines in WW II. Midget Submarines Based in the Philippines, 1944-1945. Retrieved 29 April 2016.
  • Hayden, Joseph Ralston, ed. (1937). "Fugate, James 1877-1938". Bentley Historical Library. University of Michigan. Retrieved 29 April 2016.
  • "Patrol Summary". USS Bowfin. USS Bowfin Submarine Museum & Park. 2002. Retrieved 29 April 2016.
  • Genove, Rene (10 October 2009). "Butterfly sanctuary launched in Siquijor". Visayan Daily Star. Retrieved 29 April 2016.
  • Siquijor Provincial Tourism Office (2010). Siquijor: The Healing Paradise. Provincial Government of Siquijor.

External links

Siquijor Media related to Siquijor at Wikimedia Commons Siquijor Siquijor travel guide from Wikivoyage

  • Siquijor island - information

Siquijor Geographic data related to Siquijor at OpenStreetMap

Siquijor

Acèh Propinsi Siquijor ▪ العربية سيكيخور ▪ Bân-lâm-gú Siquijor ▪ Bikol Central Siquijor ▪ Català Siquijor ▪ Cebuano Siquijor ▪ Chavacano de Zamboanga Siquijor ▪ Deutsch Siquijor ▪ Español Provincia de Siquijor ▪ Esperanto Sikijoro ▪ فارسی سیکیخور ▪ Français Siquijor ▪ 한국어 시키호르 주 ▪ Ilokano Siquijor ▪ Bahasa Indonesia Siquijor ▪ Italiano Provincia di Siquijor ▪ Kapampangan Siquijor ▪ Кырык мары Сикихор ▪ Македонски Сигијор ▪ Nederlands Siquijor (provincie) ▪ 日本語 シキホル州 ▪ Norsk bokmål Siquijor ▪ Occitan Siquijor ▪ Polski Siquijor ▪ Português Siquijor ▪ Русский Сикихор ▪ Scots Siquijor ▪ Suomi Siquijor ▪ Svenska Siquijor (provins) ▪ Tagalog Siquijor ▪ Türkçe Siquijor (il) ▪ اردو سیقیحور ▪ Winaray Siquijor ▪ 中文 錫基霍爾省

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